Minor League Mote.io

Got some cool feedback on Mote.io today:

Hello, I just wanted to recommend making it so when you are on your phone you can better navigate what’s on your computer if you are not actually looking at your computer. I use it mostly to power pandora to listen to music over a PA system, and when i need to run it I just have to remember where all the buttons are without looking at the computer.

I actually work for a Minor League Baseball team, and I use this app to control pandora in our stadium so I don’t have to keep going all the way up to the press box to change the channel, skip, thumbs up or down. I would just recommend making it easier to switch stations from the app without being at the computer.

Show Your Work

 

I don’t go to Urban Outfitters often. But when I do, I buy small square yellow books that are less than 100 pages and half pictures.

I bought “Show Your Work” by Austin Kleon thinking it would help get inside the minds of users for my new project, DevPort. It turns out it inspired me to set up YAB (yet another blog). So here we are, once again.

Most of my Tumblr stuff made it over; though I’ve combined all three of my Tumblrs into a single blog found here.

One interesting note from “Show your work” is how Austin referred to blogs. He calls them “your own little corner,” which is easy enough to relate to. He also suggests using your own domain, your own site, and your own blog engine. Avoid the trendiness, restrictions, and judgements from Tumblr, Medium, etc. This is your corner and you should decide what that means.

I think I was too intimidated to post more on Tumblr knowing that all my friends, employers, and a handful of Venture Capitalists would get pinged about it. Then again, I was afraid nobody would read my content if I didn’t have a network to support it.

Well fuck it, now I have my corner and I’m going to write whatever I want.

Hacker

When I was 15 or 16 I saw the move “Hackers” and it became my fantasy. I never spray painted my computer or learned how to roller blade; I thought learning to crack was the sure path to my “Hackers” enlightenment.

As I past through different scenes: academia, hackathons, the startup life, electronic music clubs… each world offering a taste but not quite fully encapsulating my fantasy.

Over the years I’ve had this urge to create some gathering place for hackers. First it was the “Hacker Hotel,” and most recently the “Hacker Bar.” Of course, in each scenario I imagine the bunker the characters in “Hackers” hang out in. On paper, these ideas quickly morph into kushier hangouts for startup folks.

At Electric Forest this year, my friend Andrew broke out a “Tron costume” and I remember slapping his back and shouting “you’re keeping the hacker spirit alive!”

It’s all I’ve ever hoped to do, but I can’t even explain what the hacker spirit is.

It’s somewhere between startup life and touring with Phish in a converted school bus. It’s blasting Gramatik out of a speaker while riding a neon yellow bike around downtown NYC. It’s wearing Google Glass at a standup desk with three monitors. It’s smoking hookah in UV light in your dirty old basement. It’s going to the arcade everyday to play DDR. It’s starting your ancient car with a switch you wired in yourself from RadioShack. It’s being a virtual worker. It’s a warehouse full of 3d printers, laser cutters, and an auto bay. It’s doing yoga to dubstep. It’s knowing your friends as screen names first and flesh months later.

Like any culture it’s impossible to define, but you know what it means to be a part of.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hacker_(programmer_subculture)

Fuck that city

“Where are you from!?”

“New York”

“FUCK THAT CITY. I moved from New York to Austin 10 years ago and never looked back.”

The was the first person I met in Austin. We split a cab from the airport to the bar I was meeting my friends at.

“New York City. I’ll tell you what. I ain’t never left anything there, so I ain’t goin back.”

Mote.io Now Supports Spotify + New Pandora Stations

The hackers are at it again! Rutgers student, Waynce Change or @wyc on github put together a Spotify remote! This remote works with the web player.

Now you can search, play, pause, backtrack and skip songs on Spotify Web with your phone. I know one person in particular who’s going to be very happy about this!

Chrome will update the extension to the latest version automatically, but if you need to install it head over to the Chrome Web Store.

That brings us to a total of a dozen remotes! We started with just 6 remotes at launch, and although we’ve both created and lost remotes along the way, the current list of supported sites stands strong!

The full list of remotes include:

  • Vimeo
  • Hype machine
  • Google Play music
  • Grooveshark
  • Youtube
  • Pandora
  • Soundcloud
  • Rdio
  • Tunein radio
  • Twitch.tv
  • Last.fm
  • Spotify web

Remember, you can make your own remote or improve existing ones by contributing to the Mote.io Chrome Extension. Hackers like you are responsible for making the last half dozen remotes.

I’m also excited to announce, a very highly requested feature, the ability to change Pandora stations!

Pandora is the most popular remote by far, and the ability to create new stations is the most common feature request.

Now when you synchronize your phone with the Mote.io extension and Pandora, you’ll get a search bar where you can type the name of an artist to use for a new station. Get the update from the Chrome Web Store.

That’s everything for now! Make sure to follow me or the Mote.io account on Twitter for more updates.

Concerned siblings

Because margins collapse, the elements need not be concerned with their siblings.

Whenever you work with CSS, it is important that the properties and values you assign to a class are only relevant to that specific class and never in relation to a sibling.

For example you never want to add more margin-top to an element because it is “too close to the header.” The correct approach would be to add more margin-bottom to the header.

Character Development

A couple months ago I made a spreadsheet called “Friends.”

I listed all the people I wanted to spend time and put them in a spreadsheet. I still feel dirty about it.

image

The truth is, it solved a problem that was becoming a larger and larger issue for me last year. My friends were becoming a victim of my inability to keep up with the intense networking system in NY.

To set the stage here, there’s all sorts of funny stuff going on.

  • Personally I’ve been tricked into interviewing for jobs or “wined and dined” in hopes I would be willing to pick up a contract gig at a cheap price.
  • A friend recently told me that he couldn’t trust the advice of a mentor because he didn’t know if he was using him to orchestrate his uprising as an industry figure.
  • Another friend who is more interested in the food he’s eating than the people he meets, but feels it’s his responsibility to continue networking.
  • I’ve been given advice “do this favor” so that this person owes you something in return.

Personally I’m not interested in playing this game.